Division of property between brother and sister after father’s death

Division of property between brother and sister after father death

Under Hindu Law, brother and sister are at par when it comes to the devolution of property of a father dying intestate.

When a Hindu male dies intestate (without leaving a will), his property devolves upon the legal heirs as per Section 8 of the Hindu Succession Act, 1956. The legal heirs are as follows:

  • Class I heirs
  • Class II heirs (if no one in class I)
  • Agnates (if no one in class II)
  • Cognates (if no one in agnates)

Class I heirs as mentioned in the Schedule of the Act are:

  • Son
  • Daughter
  • Widow
  • Mother
  • Son of a pre-deceased son
  • Daughter of a pre-deceased son
  • Son of a pre-deceased daughter
  • Daughter of a pre-deceased daughter
  • Widow of a pre-deceased son
  • Son of a pre-deceased son of a pre-deceased son
  • Daughter of a pre-deceased son of a pre-deceased son
  • Widow of a pre-deceased son of a pre-deceased son
  • Son of a predeceased daughter of a predeceased daughter
  • Daughter of a deceased daughter of a predeceased daughter
  • Daughter of a predeceased son of a predeceased daughter
  • Daughter of a predeceased daughter of a predeceased son

There are 16 class I heirs. Eleven are females, and 5 are males.

Rules for distribution of property among brother and sister (both are class I heirs):

  • Class I heirs get their share simultaneously and to the exclusion of others.As per the rules, son and daughter (brother and sister) are entitled to equal share in the property.

e.g. a father dies leaving behind a mother, a widow and one son and two daughters, his property would be divided into five equal parts, and each of these legal heirs will get one-fifth share.

Stepson or stepdaughter: Daughter and son must be natural or adopted children. Stepchildren are not included in the definition of son and daughter under the Act.

  • Children of predeceased son or daughter will take between them one share, e.g. If the daughter is predeceased and has two children, then in the above example, the property is divided into five parts, and one-fifth share of the deceased daughter will be shared further by these two children equally.

Ancestral or self-acquired property

The daughter (sister) has equal right as a son (brother) in the ancestral as well as the self-acquired property of the father.

Under Hindu law, there is a concept of coparcenary. It is a small unit within a joint Hindu family and consists of male lineal descendants’ of four generations with the eldest male member as the head and his male lineal descendants as coparceners. After the amendment of 2005 in the Act, the daughters are considered as coparceners and have equal right in the ancestral property as a son.

Marital Status: Marital Status of the daughter (sister) makes no difference.

Date of birth of a daughter (sister): The Amendment of 2005 came into effect on 09.09.2005. The daughters born before or after this date are considered as coparceners.

If the daughter is not living on 09.09.2005, her children are entitled to get a share in ancestral property.

If the father is not living on 09.09.2005, the daughter cannot seek partition of ancestral property.

Testamentary succession: However, in case of self-acquired property of the father, he can make a will of the same as per his desire, and the property bequeaths to the person named in the will.

In the case of ancestral property, a Will can be made by a father once he has acquired his share.

Can a father give his property to one son?

Can a father give his property to one son

The property has most of the time been a bone of contention among the family members. Between a father and his children, the distribution of property can cause problems if the father has to make choices and distribution is not equal. It is always advisable to get timely legal advice in property matters and place all documents in order.

A father’s right to deal with his property has to be exercised as per the provisions of law:

  • Statutory laws
  • Personal laws

If the father has self-acquired property, he is free to deal with it as his children have no right to claim it during his lifetime. If he dies intestate (without leaving a will behind), all children are entitled to get it as legal heirs.

However, if the property is ancestral he cannot deal with it freely as per his wish as all his children have a share in that property and his sons can claim partition of the same.

Read: Lawyer Nidhi Singh interview on Asian Voice

What is self-acquired property?

A property acquired by a person:

  • Purchased with own resources
  • As a gift
  • Through a testamentary document, e.g. will
  • Received as a legal heir – i.e. share of ancestral property received after partition or share of any other property acquired as a legal heir.
  • When a Hindu dies intestate, his property devolves as per Section 8 of the Hindu Succession Act, and such property which comes in the hands of a legal heir becomes his self acquired property.

Distribution of self-acquired property of a father:

  • A father is within his rights to give the self-acquired -property to his one son to the exclusion of other children.
  • During his lifetime, his children have no right to claim it. He can pass the same to his one son by gift or by will.
  • However, if another son has contributed towards the purchase of self-acquired property of the father and he can prove his contribution, he has a right in the said property. Then in such a situation, a father cannot pass the self-acquired property to one son excluding the son who has contributed.

What is the ancestral property?

  • A property which has passed on undivided up to four generations of male lineage is called ancestral property. The property should be four generations old. A person inherits the property as a descendant.
  • The property inherited from father, grandfather or great grandfather becomes ancestral property.
  • The property inherited from mother, uncle, grandmother or any other relative is not ancestral property.
  • The property received as a gift or through a will is not ancestral.

Distribution of ancestral property of a father:

  • In an ancestral property, all the sons have a right by birth and therefore, the father cannot give the ancestral property to one son to the exclusion of others. After amendment of 2005 in the Hindu Succession Act, even daughters are coparceners and have a right in the ancestral property.
  • A father cannot freely give the ancestral property to one son. In Hindu law, the ancestral property can be gifted only under certain situations like distress or for pious reasons. Otherwise, the ancestral property cannot be given away to one child to the exclusion of all others.

For Muslim and Christians, there is no concept of ancestral property. The property can be given to one son as per the limit permitted under personal law for Muslims.

For Christians, the property is considered as self-acquired despite mode of acquisition and rights are governed as per the Indian Succession Act, 1925.

CAN A GIFT DEED BE CHALLENGED IN INDIA

CAN A GIFT DEED BE CHALLENGED IN INDIA

Yes. A Gift deed being an instrument for transferring the rights in the property can be challenged in India.

Gift:                A gift is a gratuitous transfer of property by a donor to a donee voluntarily.

Gift Deed:     A legal document describing the transfer of property. A gift deed is an agreement between the two parties (donor and donee) for transfer of right in the property.

Essentials to make a gift valid:

  • Property: The property to be gifted can be moveable or immovable. It must be an existing property. Future property cannot be transferred
  • Acceptance of gift: The gift has to be accepted by the donee or on his behalf. If the gift is not accepted during the lifetime of the donor, it is invalid. If the donee dies without accepting the gift, it becomes void.
  • Parties must be competent to contract: Donor has to be a person capable of making a contract.  A minor cannot be a donor. However, a minor can be a donee. In such a case, the gift has to be accepted by a guardian on his behalf.
  • Consideration:  There is no consideration in gift. There can be a conditional gift such that the condition is not based on donor’s will or pleasure. The conditional gifts are incomplete until conditions are complied with. 
  • Voluntarily: Gift has to be made with free consent. Free consent implies the absence of :
  • Fraud
  • Coercion
  • Misrepresentation
  • Undue influence
  • Registration: A gift deed made for transferring immovable property has to be registered compulsorily as per The Registration Act, 1908.  The gift deed has to be signed by the parties and attested by two witnesses.

When we gift any moveable property, gift deed is not mandatory. The gift deed even if made, may or may not be registered but delivery and acceptance is a must.

Grounds for challenging the Gift Deed:

A gift deed can be challenged if any of the above mentioned legal requirements for making a gift transaction valid have not been complied with, like:

  • Consent was not free.
  • Gift deed not executed and registered as per legal provisions
  • Parties not competent to contract
  • Consideration is present.
  • Acceptance not made
  • If the gift is conditional and the condition is not fulfilled, gift deed can be revoked.

Revocation of gift deed:

  • Gift deed can be revoked by the donor for any legally valid reason as available for rescinding the contract.
  • Revocation by agreement – Donor and donee may agree at the time of making the gift that the gift can be revoked on the happening of an event which is not dependent on the will of the donor. The condition for revoking the gift should be made clear to the donee at the time of executing the gift deed. The unilateral revocation of the gift is not possible.
  • If the gift is incomplete and the title remains with the donor, the gift deed can be cancelled by the donor.

When to file suit for cancellation of gift deed:

A civil suit for cancellation of a gift deed can be filed within three years of coming to the knowledge of the fact that there exists a ground to challenge the gift deed.

A gift deed can also be cancelled by executing a cancellation deed if both parties agree.

Lawyer Nidhi Singh’s interview on Asian Voice

One to One with Keith Vaz- Nidhi Singh

Her upbringing is her grounded base; Speedy justice is what she lives and flies around the Globe for, and her company is the winged medium for attaining all that – here is an in-depth interview on Asian Voice of Nidhi Singh, Founder & CEO NRI Legal Services. Talking about her work, her beliefs and her dreams, Nidhi mentions the relevance of parental influences and the challenges of establishing herself in a society which is still learning to take professional women seriously, and where the legal sector is looked at with suspicion. She speaks about her passion for justice for all, and her keenness to ensure that justice is not delayed. Nidhi believes in the higher good for all – and lays emphasis on the ‘purpose’ that all of here are alive for! She aims to expand the work domain of NRI Legal Services as a world-class organisation.

Read full interview

Division of Property Among Daughters and Daughters-In-Law

Division of Property Among Daughters and Daughters-In-Law

Daughters and daughter – in – laws are on different footing when it comes to shares they receive on division of property in a family. Devolution of property by inheritance or succession is influenced by personal laws and is governed by various statutes.

Position of daughters: Equal right as a son

In the case of Hindus (Jains, Sikhs and Buddhists) division of property is governed by Hindu Succession Act, 1956.

Hindu law recognises the concept of a Hindu Undivided family. Only males up to four generations (lineal descendants from a common ancestor) are coparceners, and all others are members of the family. After the amendment of 2005 in the 1956 Act, daughter whether married or unmarried is a coparcener. After marriage, daughter ceases to be a member of father’s HUF but still, she is a coparcener. A daughter has the rights and liabilities of a coparcener.

  • She can demand partition, has a birthright in the undivided family property.
  • She can be a Karta also, i.e. head of the family if she is the eldest coparcener.
  • If the daughter dies intestate, her share in the HUF property passes by succession to her legal heirs as per section 15 of the 1956 Act.
  • A daughter is a coparcener but a daughter in-law is only a member of joint family.

In case of self-acquired property of the father, son or daughter has no birthright in the same. If the father dies intestate, devolution of property takes place as per rules of 1956 Act under which daughter is covered as Class I heir and has an equal right along with son and other legal heirs.

Read: Do grandchildren have a right to their grandfather’s property?

Daughters also have a share in mother’s property. Daughters and sons have equal rights in the property of their mother.

Position of daughter- in- law: Limited Rights

A daughter in law has no right in the ancestral or self-acquired property of her in-laws.

After the death of her husband, i.e. as a widow, she has the right in her husband’s property left behind by him. This property can be either ancestral or self-acquired. The right acquired by her is as a widow of the deceased husband.

Thus if a father dies intestate, a daughter has an equal right in his property along with her brother, but the daughter in law has no right in the property of her father- in law till the time her husband is alive. After the death of her husband, she is entitled to get the share in the property of her husband along with his other legal heirs.

Read: Property rights of a daughter in a hindu family

The daughter in law has a right to residence only till the time matrimonial relationship exists with her husband. The right of residence is there even if the house is a rented accommodation. If the property is a self-acquired property of her father in law, daughter in law has no right of residence as the said house is not shared house because the husband has no share in it.

A widowed daughter in law has right of maintenance from her father in law under certain conditions only, as prescribed in Hindus Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956.

Division of property:

When there is a division of property in a joint Hindu Family, the daughters enjoy equal right along with sons. The daughter in law has no right in the property of her in-laws. She acquires rights to the in-law’ property only through her husband.

The daughter in one family becomes daughter in law in another family after her marriage. She has full rights in the property of her father even after marriage but limited rights in the property of her in-laws.